Aller directement au contenu
Cute Semi rustic Cabin nice view mountains lake
Cute Semi rustic Cabin nice view mountains lake
3 voyageurs
Studio
1 lit
1 salle de bain
3 voyageurs
Studio
1 lit
1 salle de bain
Vous ne serez débité que si vous confirmez

Cute Semi rustic Cabin nice view of mountains lake and woods.
384 square feet cabin with 3/4 bath (shower)
nice quite private location
7 miles from Kenai river 4 miles form Kasilof river.
1 queen bed
full kitchen has microwave sink toaster oven stove oven refrigerator
BBQ outside along with picnic table

Le logement

The location is what counts with this place. It is centrally located out of the hustle and bustle of the summer rush in the city. It is located a short 10 minute or less drive to the Kenai River and only a 5 minute drive to the Kasilof river or the beach. The views are lovely and it is very quite for being so close to everything. Very private, close to excellent fishing, hiking, sightseeing, Clam digging, beaches, mountains and Kenai National wild life refuge. Also close to Kasilof Kenai, Sold-otna, Cooper landing, Homer, Anchor Point, Ninilchik, Seward, Moose Pass and Whittier.

Accès des voyageurs

Tons of parking Wi-Fi Drift boat on site can be rented for $125.00 per day Kayaks for $40.00 a day all come with life jackets oars etc

Autres remarques

KENAI PENINSULA: The Kenai area is just a short 20 minute commuter flight (planes leave every half hour) from Anchorage, or a beautiful 147 mile drive through spectacular Alaska scenery. Anchorage has a large International Airport, and has convenient air service from the most major west coast, Midwest, and east coast cities. With the amount of daylight that is received in summer (almost 24 hours of it in June and July) you can leave home and arrive with plenty of time to explore the area and get ready for your fishing trip of a lifetime. Kenai Town's population 7,000 is the largest city in the Kenai Peninsula. Constantly changing, modern structures stand side by side with old log buildings. Kenai has numerous restaurants, fast food stores, bars, supermarkets, visitors and cultural centers, and auto repair shops. Limousine services, taxi, and car rental are in the airport and in town. The stores in Kenai offer fine shopping opportunities. Laundromats, showers, and dump station available, as well as ambulance or police assistance, there are three medical clinics plus a general hospital. Kenai Municipal Airport, one of the busiest commuter airports in the country, is the largest in the peninsula and is essential in supporting today's lifestyle in a state where going by air is not only the fastest way of getting there, but often the only way. Scheduled flights, charters and aircraft rentals are available. A floatplane basin accommodates transient aircraft on floats and provides slips for local floatplanes. Pilots wishing fuel can telephone to the Kenai airport and a truck will deliver to the basin. You may flight in fixed wing aircraft or by helicopter. The City of Sold-otna is a beautiful, vital, growing city with a lot to offer to residents and visitors alike. In the summer check out our elevated boardwalks, river fishing, camping, canoeing, wildlife viewing, bike trails, and hiking. In the winter, you can enjoy world-class ski trails, snow machining, snow shoeing, or ice skating at our Olympic-size hockey rink. The history of the City of Sold-otna begins with homesteading that occurred in the late 1940s, although Native Alaskan Athabaskan peoples had lived and used the areas around the Kenai River for many thousands of years prior to the City’s establishment. After World War II, veterans were given priority in homesteading in this area and settlement began to grow. The construction of the Sterling Highway from Anchorage and the Kenai Spur Highway occurred in the 1950s, resulting in increased settlement in the area. A post office for Sold-otna was established in 1949. Oil was discovered at the nearby Swanson River area in 1957, giving the population and economy of the area another major boost. Sold-otna location at the junction of the Sterling and Kenai Spur highways resulted in the area becoming a major location for retail trade, services and government on the Kenai Peninsula. The City of Sold-otna incorporated as a fourth class city in 1960 with 332 residents and an area of 7.4 square miles (4,723.4 acres). Although the major highways were constructed in the 1950s and oil had been discovered in 1957, the population of the area at the time was relatively small. After the Borough was incorporated in 1964 and selected Sold-otna as the Borough seat, the City reorganized as a first class city which provided the residents of the City more authority to manage and finance the rapid growth that was occurring. The City’s central location on the Kenai Peninsula and the development of the oil industry on the peninsula and other parts of Alaska resulted in rapid population growth in the City’s first three decades (1960 to 1990). As the City and the oil industry have matured, population growth has slowed. Sold-otna was mostly built up and already near its current population by the end of the early 1980s building boom. The City’s pattern of growth has been confined and shaped by natural and man-made features. The Kenai River, local wetlands, and the natural terrain have concentrated development in the western portion of Sold-otna while the three major highways (Sterling Highway, Kenai Spur Road, Kalifornsky Beach Road) have resulted in a linear pattern of commercial development stretching out from Sold-otna into the unincorporated areas. KENAI: Kenai is located on the Kenai Peninsula where the world-famous Kenai River meets Cook Inlet. It is surrounded by spectacular scenery and wildlife, and has a rich history of native and Russian settlements and culture. Kenai is the heart of Alaskan adventure, providing something for everyone. The Kenai River is known for its world-class King Salmon fishing. Kenai industries include oil, natural gas, commercial fishing and tourism. Located near Sold-otna Seward and Homer, Alaska, Kenai is easily accessible from Anchorage via a 30-minute flight or a leisurely and beautiful 3-hour drive, approximately 150 miles to the south. Fly into our Kenai airport or our floatplane basin. Boat into our public dock. Kenai is equipped for both visitors and convention business. Kenai has it all. NIKISKI: Is an unincorporated area that stretches for several miles on either side of the road. There are motels, trailer and camper parks, grocery stores, restaurants, gas stations, convenience stores, post office, and numerous shops, many clustered in the Nikiski Mall. Nikiski fire department's two stations serve an extensive area that not only includes the northern peninsula and Cook Inlet but reaches across the inlet to a section of the mainland. In addition to general emergency calls, personnel and equipment are further geared to respond to calls from offshore oil and gas platforms as well as oil and chemical industries onshore. Boats and helicopter support are available for rescue operations. The department was a leader in developing paramedic services; the Arctic, Subarctic Aquatic Para rescue team and fire training as a combined operation on the peninsula. CAPTAIN COOK STATE PARK: Encompasses about 4,000 acres of forest, lakes, rivers and salt water beaches. The area offers swimming, a canoe landing and take out point for the Swanson river canoe trails, a good place to fish for silver salmon August and September, picnic sites and camping. The park was named after the famous British explorer Captain James Cook who came to this part of the world in 1778 in the ship "Discovery". STERLING: Oil was discovered in 1957 in the Swanson river area and a road build to the development from Sterling. The gravel road also opened up the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge (then called the Moose Range) to more convenient camping, picnicking, hunting, fishing and other activities. Sterling remains the getaway to the northern portion of the refuge. Sterling has school, post office, fire station, restaurants, groceries, bars, lodging, gas, and private campgrounds with hookups, laundry and showers. You can buy furniture, second hand items, antiques, gifts, and handmade articles. WHITTIER: Situated at the head of Passage Canal, the community of Whittier is approximately 58 miles southeast of Anchorage. Whittier is by far the most visited gateway to the mesmerizing wilderness of Prince William Sound. Each summer, thousands of visitors arrive at this magnificent port by ship, train, or automobile. The 218 distinguished citizens of Whittier are waiting with open arms to share this incredible gem of the Alaskan frontier and regale you with our stories of first hand experiences which come from living in a land like no other. There is no describing the 22 hours of daylight we enjoy each summer. There is not a bad seat in the house. As you enter Whittier from North America's longest tunnel, the panoramic view of the ocean, mountains and glaciers surround you. Our sea side village is home to an exciting array of wildlife. If you are a birder, come enjoy our world class collection of raptors such as the Bald Eagle, Great Gray Owl, and the elusive Peregrine Falcon. Whittier boasts the largest Kittiwake bird rookery population in the North Pacific. Thinking there might be fish in these here waters? You are on the right track. The 15,000 square miles of Prince William Sound is home to one of the richest wild marine fisheries on the planet! Land animals more your bag? The mountains surrounding Whittier are host to the shy mountain goat, all manner of weasels, whistling marmots, bear, and the occasional coyote. During our glorious summer we are often visited by Humpback and Orca whales plying the 600 foot deep Passage Canal in search of dinner. Land and sea otters along with seals and sea lions may be keeping a careful eye on you to make sure they will not have to share their next meal with you. If action is more your style, Whittier has you covered. The historical 10,000 year old Portage trail is located on the right as you roll into town. Horsetail Falls and Emerald Point trails are great improved trails to get your feet wet. Are improved trails too mundane? I have called Whittier my home for over 20 years and I have yet to cover 2% of the wild wild wilderness. Bring a compass and a map because your cell phone will disappoint. Be careful, gravity is no joke! If a wildlife & glacier day cruise, peaceful kayak excursion or scenic train ride sounds intriguing, this is a superb destination. HOMER: is located in south-central Alaska, 227 road miles from Anchorage (Alaska’s largest city), near the southern tip of the Kenai Peninsula, on stunning Kachemak Bay. Made famous as “The End of the Road” in Tom Bodett's tales, Homer is at the end of the Sterling Highway. Homer is accessible by road, boat, and daily flights from Anchorage. A home base for great fishing (“The Halibut Fishing Capital of the World”), kayaking, bear viewing, hiking, foodie and art vacations, Homer is quickly becoming known also as the Eco and Adventure tourism capital of Alaska. Nestled among rolling hills, this seaside – and truly seagoing - community has many unique attractions. Home port to the F/V Time Bandit of the Discovery Channel’s “Deadliest Catch” fame, Homer's museums, art galleries, fine dining (you will be amazed at the quality of our restaurants) and deluxe accommodations, all help create Alaska-sized memories to last a lifetime. The Homer Spit ("spit" is a geological landform term) is the second longest in the world and was recently named one of the best 100 beaches in the United States for its incredible views and variety of wildlife along the wonderful 4.5 mile multi-use trail that runs from its base to its tip – the true end of the road on Alaska’s Highway 1. Just across the Bay, less than 10 miles from the Spit, is the state's only designated wilderness park – Kachemak Bay State Wilderness Park. Local water taxis specialize in bringing outdoor lovers to the trailheads and campgrounds of the park. This unique combination of location, commerce, beauty, natural resources and wilderness makes Homer a wonderful place to visit, and a great place to live!


Équipements
Cuisine
Pour familles/enfants
Internet sans fil
Parking gratuit sur place

Communiquez toujours via Airbnb
Pour protéger votre paiement, ne transférez jamais d'argent et n'établissez pas de contact en dehors du site ou de l'application Airbnb.

Couchages
Espaces communs
1 canapé

Règlement intérieur
Non fumeur
Ne convient pas aux animaux
Pas de fête ni de soirée
Ne convient pas aux bébés (moins de 2 ans)
L'entrée dans les lieux se fait à partir de 16:00
Départ avant 12:00
Montant de la caution : 437€

Annulations

1 commentaire

Profil utilisateur de Stephen
juillet 2016
My fiance and I were visiting Alaska to attend my aunt's wedding. This cabin and our stay were wonderful! There are beautiful views of the forest with a glimpse of a lake and shoreline in the distance. The room was clean and very comfortable with anything we could have needed. John and Meredith were very friendly and made us feel extremely welcome during our stay at their cabin. One evening we sat by the fire and they gave us several awesome tips for things to do on one of our free days. Conveniently located just outside (URL HIDDEN) you are only minutes away from restaurants, groceries stores, and more! Next time we are looking to visit Alaska, we would certainly stay with John and Meredith again!

Alaska, États-UnisMembre depuis septembre 2014
Profil utilisateur de John & Meredith
Échanges avec les voyageurs

Open. You can be left completely alone or come hang out! Always a text or call away.

À propos de John & Meredith

Easy going laid back friendly couple. We have a small farm. we do guided guided snowmobile trips in the winter. Alaskan residents that enjoy all Alaska has to offer.

Le quartier

Logements similaires