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Gwynedd : les meilleures activités

Découvrez la ville à travers les yeux des habitants. Trouvez les meilleures activités, les meilleures tables et obtenez de précieux conseils auprès des personnes qui vivent ici.

Château
“Its a good day out if the weather is ok. Conwy Castle (Welsh: Castell Conwy) is a fortification in Conwy, located in North Wales. It was built by Edward I, during his conquest of Wales, between 1283 and 1289. Constructed as part of a wider project to create the walled town of Conwy, the combined defences cost around £15,000, a huge sum for the period. Over the next few centuries, the castle played an important part in several wars. It withstood the siege of Madog ap Llywelyn in the winter of 1294–95, acted as a temporary haven for Richard II in 1399 and was held for several months by forces loyal to Owain Glyndŵr in 1401. ”
57 habitants locaux recommandent
Autres grands espaces
“Longest zip wire in Europe, meant to be very fast but quite pricey, however everyone who has done it loved it. Its about 30 mins by car from our annexe”
82 habitants locaux recommandent
Parc
“Mountainous 823-square-mile National Park, including remote villages, lakes and of course Snowdon. if your feeling energetic you can walk to the top or if you dont fancy the walk you can take a train. It all depends which route you take but should take somewhere between 5-7 hours to reach the summit and walk back down (3 hours each way) (or just 1 hour if you take the Snowdon Mountain Railway to the top!). Snowdon is about an hour drive from us ”
67 habitants locaux recommandent
Athlétisme et sports
“There are few places on earth where you can surf inland, but as luck would have it one of them is in North Wales. Adventure Parc Snowdonia is home to our world-first surf lagoon and the only guaranteed surf break in the UK. But that’s not all! Check out our brand-new indoor and outdoor activities, including our brand-new Adrenaline Indoors facility and Explore Outdoors adventures. ”
63 habitants locaux recommandent
Autres grands espaces
“Used to be Go Ape so its similar experience, zip wires, climbing trees, vertical drops, great fun by everyone who has visited, think its a bit pricey but well worth it. About 30 minute drive at the most. ”
44 habitants locaux recommandent
Château
“If you've never seen a castle up close, this is your chance ! Walk in and around the walls of Caernarfon Castle. A must.”
44 habitants locaux recommandent
Autres grands espaces
“This is a cavern full of Huge trampolines meant to be really good fun, quite pricey, but well worth it, journey time of around 40 minutes each way”
36 habitants locaux recommandent
Parc
$$
“80-acre garden containing plants collected more than a century ago on global expeditions. Its a 15 minute drive from the annexe well worth a look and a day out, beautiful gardens ”
27 habitants locaux recommandent
Mountain
“The best adventure - amazing places to hike. And lots of options to hire guides (please ask Rachael or Mike for more details)”
52 habitants locaux recommandent
Château
“Caernarfon Castle (Welsh: Castell Caernarfon) – often anglicized as Carnarvon Castle or Caernarvon Castle – is a medieval fortress in Caernarfon, Gwynedd, north-west Wales cared for by Cadw, the Welsh Government's historic environment service. It was a motte-and-bailey castle in the town of Caernarfon from the late 11th century until 1283 when King Edward I of England began replacing it with the current stone structure. The Edwardian town and castle acted as the administrative centre of north Wales and as a result the defences were built on a grand scale. There was a deliberate link with Caernarfon's Roman past and the Roman fort of Segontium is nearby. While the castle was under construction, town walls were built around Caernarfon. The work cost between £20,000 and £25,000 from the start until the end of work in 1330. Despite Caernarfon Castle's external appearance of being mostly complete, the interior buildings no longer survive and many of the building plans were never finished. The town and castle were sacked in 1294 when Madog ap Llywelyn led a rebellion against the English. Caernarfon was recaptured the following year. During the Glyndŵr Rising of 1400–1415, the castle was besieged. When the Tudor dynasty ascended to the English throne in 1485, tensions between the Welsh and English began to diminish and castles were considered less important. As a result, Caernarfon Castle was allowed to fall into a state of disrepair. Despite its dilapidated condition, during the English Civil War Caernarfon Castle was held by Royalists, and was besieged three times by Parliamentarian forces. This was the last time the castle was used in war. Caernarfon Castle was neglected until the 19th century when the state funded repairs. In 1911, Caernarfon Castle was used for the investiture of the Prince of Wales, and again in 1969. It is part of the World Heritage Site "Castles and Town Walls of King Edward in Gwynedd".”
25 habitants locaux recommandent
Château
“Beaumaris Castle (Welsh: Castell Biwmares), in Beaumaris, Anglesey, Wales, was built as part of Edward I's campaign to conquer north Wales after 1282. Plans were probably first made to construct the castle in 1284, but this was delayed due to lack of funds and work only began in 1295 following the Madog ap Llywelyn uprising. A substantial workforce was employed in the initial years under the direction of James of St George. Edward's invasion of Scotland soon diverted funding from the project, however, and work stopped, only recommencing after an invasion scare in 1306. When work finally ceased around 1330 a total of £15,000 had been spent, a huge sum for the period, but the castle remained incomplete. Beaumaris Castle was taken by Welsh forces in 1403 during the rebellion of Owain Glyndŵr, but recaptured by royal forces in 1405. Following the outbreak of the English Civil War in 1642, the castle was held by forces loyal to Charles I, holding out until 1646 when it surrendered to the Parliamentary armies. Despite forming part of a local royalist rebellion in 1648, the castle escaped slighting and was garrisoned by Parliament, but fell into ruin around 1660, eventually forming part of a stately home and park in the 19th century. In the 21st century, the ruined castle is still a tourist attraction. Historian Arnold Taylor described Beaumaris Castle as Britain's "most perfect example of symmetrical concentric planning". The fortification is built of local stone, with a moated outer ward guarded by twelve towers and two gatehouses, overlooked by an inner ward with two large, D-shaped gatehouses and six massive towers. The inner ward was designed to contain ranges of domestic buildings and accommodation able to support two major households. The south gate could be reached by ship, allowing the castle to be directly supplied by sea. UNESCO considers Beaumaris to be one of "the finest examples of late 13th century and early 14th century military architecture in Europe", and it is classed as a World Heritage site.”
24 habitants locaux recommandent
Autres grands espaces
“Prepare for a truly unique and exhilarating experience; the fastest zip line in the world. Soar over Penrhyn Quarry where you could travel at speeds of over 100mph while you take in the breathtaking views and feel the freedom of flight.”
30 habitants locaux recommandent
Restaurant
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“Trendy eatery with great views over the straight specialising in home made pizza and sourdoughs cooked over wood. Always buzzing with a great atmosphere. Booking in advance highly recommended”
29 habitants locaux recommandent
Château
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“Penrhyn Castle (Welsh: Castell Penrhyn) is a country house in Llandygai, Bangor, Gwynedd, North Wales, in the form of a Norman castle. It was originally a medieval fortified manor house, founded by Ednyfed Fychan. In 1438, Ioan ap Gruffudd was granted a licence to crenellate and he founded the stone castle and added a tower house. Samuel Wyatt reconstructed the property in the 1780s. The present building was created between about 1822 and 1837 to designs by Thomas Hopper, who expanded and transformed the building beyond recognition. However a spiral staircase from the original property can still be seen, and a vaulted basement and other masonry were incorporated into the new structure. Hopper's client was George Hay Dawkins-Pennant (1764–1840), who had inherited the Penrhyn Estate on the death of his second cousin, The 1st Baron Penrhyn (first creation; 1737–1808), who had made his fortune from slavery in Jamaica and local slate quarries. The eldest of George's two daughters, Juliana, married an aristocratic Grenadier Guard, Edward Gordon Douglas (1800–1886), who, on inheriting the estate on George's death in 1840, adopted the hyphenated surname of Douglas-Pennant. Edward, the grandson of The 14th Earl of Morton, was created The 1st Baron Penrhyn (second creation) in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1866. The cost of the construction of this vast "castle" is disputed, and very difficult to work out accurately, as much of the timber came from the family's own forestry, and much of the labour was acquired from within their own workforce at the slate quarry. It cost the Pennant family an estimated £150,000. This is the current equivalent to about £49,500,000. Penrhyn is one of the most admired of the numerous mock castles built in the United Kingdom in the 19th century; Christopher Hussey called it, "the outstanding instance of Norman revival." The castle is a picturesque composition that stretches over 600 feet from a tall donjon containing family rooms, through the main block built around the earlier house, to the service wing and the stables. Penrhyn Castle circa 1880 Penrhyn Castle between 1890 and 1900 Penrhyn Castle in 2011 The carved stonework staircase at Penrhyn It is built in a sombre style which allows it to possess something of the medieval fortress air despite the ground-level drawing room windows. Hopper designed all the principal interiors in a rich but restrained Norman style, with much fine plasterwork and wood and stone carving. The castle also has some specially designed Norman-style furniture, including a one-ton slate bed made for Queen Victoria when she visited in 1859. The 4th Baron Penrhyn died in June 1949, and the castle and estate passed to his niece, Lady Janet Pelham, who, on inheritance, adopted the surname of Douglas-Pennant. In 1951, the castle and 40,000 acres (160 km²) of land were accepted by the treasury in lieu of death duties from Lady Janet. It now belongs to the National Trust and is open to the public. The site received 109,395 visitors in 2017.”
24 habitants locaux recommandent
Establishment
“Snowdonia offers amazing views, challenging trail walks, steam train rides, zip wires etc. Something for everyone who enjoys out door pursuits.”
15 habitants locaux recommandent
Pub
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“The Black Boy Inn offers a warm welcome and good food to those in search of a relaxed and traditionally Welsh experience and environment.”
24 habitants locaux recommandent