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La guida di Sara

Sara

La guida di Sara

Offerta gastronomica
Suvereto, one of the most beautiful villages in Italy
Suvereto, considered one of the most beautiful villages in Italy, is located between the hills and the shining sea on the Etruscan Coast. Immersed in the green Val di Cornia, the town is a treasure chest of wonders: its walls are home to characteristic medieval alleys, stone houses, historic palaces and evocative churches. All around are endless forests and chestnut, oak and, of course, cork trees, the latter being where the town gets its name from. Infused with the aromas of the Mediterranean scrub, Suvereto is a village rich in art and history, and stands out for its pleasant views and for being a place of tranquillity and relaxation.Thanks to the luxuriant countryside surrounding the town, agricultural companies produce incredible oil and wine so characteristic that they’ve been classified as DOCG. The Wine Trail passes through these trails, a route that allows visitors to learn, one stop after another, about the places where this drink draws all its impressive traits. Suvereto is so tied to the land and tradition that it’s become a town of crafts that are today rare pearls: blacksmiths, cork workers, carpenters, coalmen and chair menders all do their work here. These skilled artisans fortunately conduct their work with pride, dotting the village with their characteristic workshops. Dominating this little gem from the hilltop above, outside the town walls, is the Rocca Aldobrandesca, reminding us of the historic medieval settlement. The defense walls enclose interesting sites, like the Romanesque Church of San Giusto, the first thing that captures the visitor’s attention upon arriving in the town and flanked by a museum that conserves paintings, vestments and statues. An important painting can be found inside the Church of the Madonna di Sopra la Porta, a 18th-century building founded by a few very devoted locals. Having survived a strong storm, they wanted to thank the Virgin Mary with a church. Amongst the other religious buildings in the village, the Convent of San Francesco and its cloister stand out high up on a hill, built in the 1200s and which today hosts concerts and performances. Another interesting thing to see in the town is the Doll Museum, dedicated to the history of play and home to a large collection of pieces that span decades. Nature also dominates in this area, as can be seen in the Montioni Nature Park, nearly 7,000 hectares in size, where the Mediterranean scrub and dense oak forests are inhabited by wild boars, deer and porcupines. The ruins of alum quarries attest to the fact that even Elisa Bonaparte, sister of Napoleon, understood the potential of such a rich territory.
40
recommandé par les habitants
Suvereto
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recommandé par les habitants
Suvereto, considered one of the most beautiful villages in Italy, is located between the hills and the shining sea on the Etruscan Coast. Immersed in the green Val di Cornia, the town is a treasure chest of wonders: its walls are home to characteristic medieval alleys, stone houses, historic palaces and evocative churches. All around are endless forests and chestnut, oak and, of course, cork trees, the latter being where the town gets its name from. Infused with the aromas of the Mediterranean scrub, Suvereto is a village rich in art and history, and stands out for its pleasant views and for being a place of tranquillity and relaxation.Thanks to the luxuriant countryside surrounding the town, agricultural companies produce incredible oil and wine so characteristic that they’ve been classified as DOCG. The Wine Trail passes through these trails, a route that allows visitors to learn, one stop after another, about the places where this drink draws all its impressive traits. Suvereto is so tied to the land and tradition that it’s become a town of crafts that are today rare pearls: blacksmiths, cork workers, carpenters, coalmen and chair menders all do their work here. These skilled artisans fortunately conduct their work with pride, dotting the village with their characteristic workshops. Dominating this little gem from the hilltop above, outside the town walls, is the Rocca Aldobrandesca, reminding us of the historic medieval settlement. The defense walls enclose interesting sites, like the Romanesque Church of San Giusto, the first thing that captures the visitor’s attention upon arriving in the town and flanked by a museum that conserves paintings, vestments and statues. An important painting can be found inside the Church of the Madonna di Sopra la Porta, a 18th-century building founded by a few very devoted locals. Having survived a strong storm, they wanted to thank the Virgin Mary with a church. Amongst the other religious buildings in the village, the Convent of San Francesco and its cloister stand out high up on a hill, built in the 1200s and which today hosts concerts and performances. Another interesting thing to see in the town is the Doll Museum, dedicated to the history of play and home to a large collection of pieces that span decades. Nature also dominates in this area, as can be seen in the Montioni Nature Park, nearly 7,000 hectares in size, where the Mediterranean scrub and dense oak forests are inhabited by wild boars, deer and porcupines. The ruins of alum quarries attest to the fact that even Elisa Bonaparte, sister of Napoleon, understood the potential of such a rich territory.
Visite turistiche
Piombino , a pearl on the sea.
Nestled on an evocative promontory across from the Tuscan Archipelago, rich in history and dotted with protected landscapes, Piombino is one of the main cities on the Etruscan Coast. Dating back to ancient times, the area’s first city developed in the prehistoric period, which is why Piombino conserves a significant number of archeological artefacts. Formerly known as Falesia’s port, Piombino was first the Signoria for the Principality under the Appiani family, and is one of the longest-lasting city-states in Italy, finally succumbing to outside power in the early 1800s, when the city fell under the rule of Elisa Bonaparte, Napoleon’s sister. Piombino’s historic center, partly protected by a beautiful defense wall, with sections of work by Leonardo da Vinci still visible, conserves traces from the medieval and Renaissance periods. Among the city’s most significant monuments, visitors will surely be interested in the Torrione, the Rivellino, and the Fonti di Marina, where ships once went to be restocked, and the beautiful 14th-century Casa delle Bifore. The churches are a wondrous treat as well, including the Cathedral of Sant’Antimo, the Chapel of the Cittadella and the Church of the Immacolata. Dating to the 1800s, the Palazzo Nuovo sits inside the Cittadella and its design boasts a contribution by Leonardo da Vinci. The Palazzo Nuovo is the former residence of Elisa Bonaparte, seat of the The Populonia Archaeological Museum and remains a principle exhibition site for the Parks of the Val di Cornia, which houses over 2,000 Pre-historic, Etruscan and Roman artefacts. Paved alleys lead to the city’s imposing Castle, home to the Museum of the Castle and Medieval Ceramics. This splendid building dates to the 1200s. Piazza Bovio is the largest coastal piazza in Europe, home to Palazzo Appiani, from which your gaze will brush the length of the coast and the islands of the Archipelago. Piombino is the ideal starting point to discover the Etruscan coast. From Piombino, you can quickly travel to the Baratti and Populonia Archaeological Park, where you can visit the largest necropolis and Etruscan acropolis on the sea, as well as the beautiful beach of Gulf of Baratti and the quaintly sheltered gulfs along the Via dei Cavalledderi, the route often used by the Grand Dukes of Tuscany to watch over the Piombino Promontory. The road passes by Buca delle Fate, Spiaggia Lunga, Fosso alle Canne and Cala Moresca, leading to the Punta Falcone Park, home to the city’s planetarium. The varied sea bottoms are so interesting that they attract enthusiasts from across Italy. This coastline is well-equipped for all marine sports and the town isn’t short of sailing, surf and scuba diving schools that cater to all levels of experience. Piombino is an important stop for boaters and those visiting the islands of the Tuscan Archipelago. Ritorto and Vignale are two small towns enchantingly situated between the hills and sea. They are full of endless beaches characterized by fine, clear sand and transparent waters. The University of Siena also leads important excavations of a large Roman-era villa in Vignale. The coastal area features important natural areas: don’t forget to see the Sterpaia Nature Park, leading to Cala Perelli e Torre Mozza, a stretch of coastline famous for its unspoiled beauty and Blue Flag beaches, the Montioni Nature Park and the Orti Bottagone WWF Nature Reserve.
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recommandé par les habitants
Piombino
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recommandé par les habitants
Nestled on an evocative promontory across from the Tuscan Archipelago, rich in history and dotted with protected landscapes, Piombino is one of the main cities on the Etruscan Coast. Dating back to ancient times, the area’s first city developed in the prehistoric period, which is why Piombino conserves a significant number of archeological artefacts. Formerly known as Falesia’s port, Piombino was first the Signoria for the Principality under the Appiani family, and is one of the longest-lasting city-states in Italy, finally succumbing to outside power in the early 1800s, when the city fell under the rule of Elisa Bonaparte, Napoleon’s sister. Piombino’s historic center, partly protected by a beautiful defense wall, with sections of work by Leonardo da Vinci still visible, conserves traces from the medieval and Renaissance periods. Among the city’s most significant monuments, visitors will surely be interested in the Torrione, the Rivellino, and the Fonti di Marina, where ships once went to be restocked, and the beautiful 14th-century Casa delle Bifore. The churches are a wondrous treat as well, including the Cathedral of Sant’Antimo, the Chapel of the Cittadella and the Church of the Immacolata. Dating to the 1800s, the Palazzo Nuovo sits inside the Cittadella and its design boasts a contribution by Leonardo da Vinci. The Palazzo Nuovo is the former residence of Elisa Bonaparte, seat of the The Populonia Archaeological Museum and remains a principle exhibition site for the Parks of the Val di Cornia, which houses over 2,000 Pre-historic, Etruscan and Roman artefacts. Paved alleys lead to the city’s imposing Castle, home to the Museum of the Castle and Medieval Ceramics. This splendid building dates to the 1200s. Piazza Bovio is the largest coastal piazza in Europe, home to Palazzo Appiani, from which your gaze will brush the length of the coast and the islands of the Archipelago. Piombino is the ideal starting point to discover the Etruscan coast. From Piombino, you can quickly travel to the Baratti and Populonia Archaeological Park, where you can visit the largest necropolis and Etruscan acropolis on the sea, as well as the beautiful beach of Gulf of Baratti and the quaintly sheltered gulfs along the Via dei Cavalledderi, the route often used by the Grand Dukes of Tuscany to watch over the Piombino Promontory. The road passes by Buca delle Fate, Spiaggia Lunga, Fosso alle Canne and Cala Moresca, leading to the Punta Falcone Park, home to the city’s planetarium. The varied sea bottoms are so interesting that they attract enthusiasts from across Italy. This coastline is well-equipped for all marine sports and the town isn’t short of sailing, surf and scuba diving schools that cater to all levels of experience. Piombino is an important stop for boaters and those visiting the islands of the Tuscan Archipelago. Ritorto and Vignale are two small towns enchantingly situated between the hills and sea. They are full of endless beaches characterized by fine, clear sand and transparent waters. The University of Siena also leads important excavations of a large Roman-era villa in Vignale. The coastal area features important natural areas: don’t forget to see the Sterpaia Nature Park, leading to Cala Perelli e Torre Mozza, a stretch of coastline famous for its unspoiled beauty and Blue Flag beaches, the Montioni Nature Park and the Orti Bottagone WWF Nature Reserve.
a Piombino....
Beaches and history
In Baratti and Populonia, along one of the most evocative stretches of the Etruscan Coast, there exist incredibly important artefacts from the Etruscan and Roman eras. In the Archeological Park, which extends for around 80 hectares and is visible from some parts of the network of equipped trails, visitors connect with history and archeology against the backdrop of an immensely evocative landscape. The Park boasts the ruins of industrial buildings from the Etruscan era, and a walk along the beach offers a glimpse of an ancient forge. The monumental necropolis of San Cerbone, the only one among the Etruscan burial sites to be built on the sea, contains the ruins of buildings that were used for working metals. On the hills, the quarries alternate with the evocative necropolis “delle Grotte,” a chamber tomb dug into the hillside. A stone-paved road, via della Romanella, leads from the lower part of the city to the acropolis. Heading down Via del Monastero is like going on a true journey back in time: the Middle Ages in Populonia show itself with the ruins of the Benedictine Monastery of San Quirico, hidden in the woods. At the center of the city is an area with Roman temples facing the piazza and, at the top of the stone-paved road, visitors can enjoy the splendid Fronte delle Logge. The medieval village of Populonia, surrounded by walls built to protect the town from pirates and dominated over by the Fortress, dating to the first half of the 15th century, charms the visitor with its paved roads, many small shops and a private museum, the Gasparri Etruscan Museum, home to Etruscan and Roman artefacts found in the area and in the stretch of neighbouring sea.
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recommandé par les habitants
Baratti
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recommandé par les habitants
In Baratti and Populonia, along one of the most evocative stretches of the Etruscan Coast, there exist incredibly important artefacts from the Etruscan and Roman eras. In the Archeological Park, which extends for around 80 hectares and is visible from some parts of the network of equipped trails, visitors connect with history and archeology against the backdrop of an immensely evocative landscape. The Park boasts the ruins of industrial buildings from the Etruscan era, and a walk along the beach offers a glimpse of an ancient forge. The monumental necropolis of San Cerbone, the only one among the Etruscan burial sites to be built on the sea, contains the ruins of buildings that were used for working metals. On the hills, the quarries alternate with the evocative necropolis “delle Grotte,” a chamber tomb dug into the hillside. A stone-paved road, via della Romanella, leads from the lower part of the city to the acropolis. Heading down Via del Monastero is like going on a true journey back in time: the Middle Ages in Populonia show itself with the ruins of the Benedictine Monastery of San Quirico, hidden in the woods. At the center of the city is an area with Roman temples facing the piazza and, at the top of the stone-paved road, visitors can enjoy the splendid Fronte delle Logge. The medieval village of Populonia, surrounded by walls built to protect the town from pirates and dominated over by the Fortress, dating to the first half of the 15th century, charms the visitor with its paved roads, many small shops and a private museum, the Gasparri Etruscan Museum, home to Etruscan and Roman artefacts found in the area and in the stretch of neighbouring sea.
Populonia is an ancient and extremely important Etruscan city; it is one of the 12 cities which make up the so-called Dodecapoli, the city-states which were part of Etruria, governed by a lucumone (similar to a king). The legacy of its illustrious past is still seen today in its small centre, filled with endless charm thanks to its location and spectacular ruins. Found at the top of a hill surrounded by the sea, the ancient town is located in a great position on one of the promontories that form the Gulf of Baratti and shows beautiful 15th-century walls constructed on the order of the Lords of Piombino.Previously known as Fufluna (from Fufluns, the Etruscan god of drunkenness) or Pupluna, it was the only Etruscan city found on the coastline. The ancient acropolis was located in the place where today you can admire the Poggio del Castello and Poggio del Telegrafo, towards the extreme south-west of the Gulf of Baratti. In the modern town, traces of the ancient city are visible, such as the Estruscan walls and ruins of Roman buildings. The medieval walls are also beautiful, put up to defend the town from pirates, as is the Fortress, built in the first half of the 15th century. Inside there are paved alleys, little shops and the private Gasparri Collection, which conserves the Etruscan and Roman ruins found in the city, under the sea and in the area in front of the sea. One street, which looks out onto some incredible views, connects Populonia to the Gulf of Baratti, where there are also some very important Etruscan sites. Here, you can visit the necropolis linked to the city in the Baratti and Populonia Archaeological Park, along with the ruins of the industrial quarter by the port; while in the neighbouring Piombino, there is the Populonia Archaeological Museum.
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recommandé par les habitants
Populonia
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recommandé par les habitants
Populonia is an ancient and extremely important Etruscan city; it is one of the 12 cities which make up the so-called Dodecapoli, the city-states which were part of Etruria, governed by a lucumone (similar to a king). The legacy of its illustrious past is still seen today in its small centre, filled with endless charm thanks to its location and spectacular ruins. Found at the top of a hill surrounded by the sea, the ancient town is located in a great position on one of the promontories that form the Gulf of Baratti and shows beautiful 15th-century walls constructed on the order of the Lords of Piombino.Previously known as Fufluna (from Fufluns, the Etruscan god of drunkenness) or Pupluna, it was the only Etruscan city found on the coastline. The ancient acropolis was located in the place where today you can admire the Poggio del Castello and Poggio del Telegrafo, towards the extreme south-west of the Gulf of Baratti. In the modern town, traces of the ancient city are visible, such as the Estruscan walls and ruins of Roman buildings. The medieval walls are also beautiful, put up to defend the town from pirates, as is the Fortress, built in the first half of the 15th century. Inside there are paved alleys, little shops and the private Gasparri Collection, which conserves the Etruscan and Roman ruins found in the city, under the sea and in the area in front of the sea. One street, which looks out onto some incredible views, connects Populonia to the Gulf of Baratti, where there are also some very important Etruscan sites. Here, you can visit the necropolis linked to the city in the Baratti and Populonia Archaeological Park, along with the ruins of the industrial quarter by the port; while in the neighbouring Piombino, there is the Populonia Archaeological Museum.
The Coastal Park of Sterpaia. Blue Flag Here we have a rare and highly-prized humid forest, which was typical of the landscape of the ancient coast of the Maremma. Miraculously surviving deforestation, it was reclaimed by the municipal authority after the unauthorised lotting of the 1970s. A magical place where the visitor can wander among centuries-old oaks in the company of the small animals that live there, finally reaching the sandy dunes and the sea itself. stagno sterpaia 01 The Park stretches along the Livornese Tyrrhenian coast, in the wide gulf between Piombino and Follonica. It occupies an area of about 296 hectares of the territory of the municipal district of Piombino, and is made up of: 17 hectares of beach along 10 Km of coast 124 hectares of dunes and dune hinterland 155 hectares of woodland and areas deforested for cultivation The coast of the park is presented with a slight crescent shape, relatively deep and gently sloping towards the sea, with fine white sand bound by a narrow dune. Its profile is marked by various towers, whose presence has specific historical reasons. Parco costiero Sterpaia Guido Coz The roads leading to the access of the park and the beaches start from the so-called “geodetic” linking Piombino and Riotorto; an articulated system of car parks enables controlled access to many beaches of the coast.
Riotorto
The Coastal Park of Sterpaia. Blue Flag Here we have a rare and highly-prized humid forest, which was typical of the landscape of the ancient coast of the Maremma. Miraculously surviving deforestation, it was reclaimed by the municipal authority after the unauthorised lotting of the 1970s. A magical place where the visitor can wander among centuries-old oaks in the company of the small animals that live there, finally reaching the sandy dunes and the sea itself. stagno sterpaia 01 The Park stretches along the Livornese Tyrrhenian coast, in the wide gulf between Piombino and Follonica. It occupies an area of about 296 hectares of the territory of the municipal district of Piombino, and is made up of: 17 hectares of beach along 10 Km of coast 124 hectares of dunes and dune hinterland 155 hectares of woodland and areas deforested for cultivation The coast of the park is presented with a slight crescent shape, relatively deep and gently sloping towards the sea, with fine white sand bound by a narrow dune. Its profile is marked by various towers, whose presence has specific historical reasons. Parco costiero Sterpaia Guido Coz The roads leading to the access of the park and the beaches start from the so-called “geodetic” linking Piombino and Riotorto; an articulated system of car parks enables controlled access to many beaches of the coast.