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Historic Site

Théâtre de Dionysos

Recommandé par 27 habitants ·

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Alkistis
Alkistis
October 09, 2019
The Theater of Dionysus was Europe’s first theater, and stood immediately below the Parthenon in Athens, Greece. It was originally built in the late 5th century B.C. The theater was an outdoor auditorium in the shape of a great semicircle on the slope of the Acropolis, with rows of seats on which…
Vasiliki
Vasiliki
August 06, 2019
Near the Acropolis museum is the fourth-century-BC Theater of Dionysus, which has a separate ticketed entrance from the rest of the Acropolis.The great Greek tragedies of Sophocles and Euripides were performed here!
Tania & Antonis
Tania & Antonis
April 13, 2019
Promenade up and down under the Acropolis on the most beautiful sidewalk of Athens and perhaps one of the most famous in Europe! The walk is very refreshing in the morning, when the area is still quiet, and very romantic in the sunset time.
Γιάννης
Γιάννης
December 27, 2018
The most important performing stage in ancient Athens. Considered to be the first theatre of the world.
Aggie’s
Aggie’s
November 02, 2018
The Theatre of Dionysus Eleuthereus is a major theatre in Athens, considered to be the world's first theatre, built at the foot of the Athenian Acropolis. Dedicated to Dionysus, the god of plays and wine (among other things), the theatre could seat as many as 17,000 people with excellent…

Théâtre de Dionysos à travers des expériences Airbnb

Découvrez ce monument emblématique grâce aux expériences Airbnb, des activités en petit groupe animées par des habitants.

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Historic Site
“The Temple of Olympian Zeus also known as the Olympieion or Columns of the Olympian Zeus, is a former colossal temple at the center of the Greek capital Athens. It was dedicated to "Olympian" Zeus, a name originating from his position as head of the Olympian gods. Construction began in the 6th century BC during the rule of the Athenian tyrants, who envisaged building the greatest temple in the ancient world, but it was not completed until the reign of the Roman Emperor Hadrian in the 2nd century AD, some 638 years after the project had begun. During the Roman period the temple -that included 104 colossal columns- was renowned as the largest temple in Greece and housed one of the largest cult statues in the ancient world. The temple's glory was short-lived, as it fell into disuse after being pillaged during a barbarian invasion in 267 AD, just about a century after its completion. It was probably never repaired and was reduced to ruins thereafter. In the centuries after the fall of the Roman Empire, it was extensively quarried for building materials to supply building projects elsewhere in the city. Despite this, a substantial part of the temple remains today, notably sixteen of the original gigantic columns, and it continues to be part of a very important archaeological site of Greece”
  • Recommandé par 138 habitants
Historic Site
“Located on the northwest side of the Acropolis lies Ancient Agora. It is home to various monuments such as Stoa Poikile, Temple of Hephaestus, Mitroo, Tholos, Stoa of Attalos, Vouleftirion and the Altar of the Twelve Gods.”
  • Recommandé par 110 habitants
Quartier
“If you feel adventurous ( meaning taking the metro and walking ) this is a beautiful neighbour full of bars and restaurants. ”
  • Recommandé par 5 habitants
History Museum
“The National Historical Museum (Greek: Εθνικό Ιστορικό Μουσείο,[1] Ethnikó Istorikó Mouseío) is a historical museum in Athens. Founded in 1882, is the oldest of its kind in Greece. It is located in the Old Parliament House at Stadiou Street in Athens, which housed the Hellenic Parliament from 1875 until 1932. Collections The museum houses the collection of the Historical and Ethnological Society of Greece (IEEE), founded in 1882.[2] It is the oldest collection of its kind in Greece, and prior to its transfer to the Old Parliament, it was housed in the main building of the National Technical University. The collection contains historical items concerning the period from the capture of Constantinopolis by the Ottomans in 1453 to the Second World War, emphasizing especially the period of the Greek Revolution and the subsequent establishment of the modern Greek state. Among the items displayed are weapons, personal belongings and memorabilia from historical personalities, historical paintings by Greek and foreign artists, manuscripts, as well as a large collection of traditional Greek costumes from various regions. The collection is displayed in the corridors and rooms of the building, while the great central hall of the National Assembly is used for conferences.”
  • Recommandé par 10 habitants
Autres grands espaces
“Also called the Hill of the Muses, Filopappou Hill – along with the hills of the Pnyx and the Nymphs – is a somewhat wild, pine-shaded spot that's good for a stroll, especially at sunset. The hill also gives some of the best vantage points for photographing the Acropolis, and views to the Saronic Gulf.The hill is identifiable by the Monument of Filopappos crowning its summit; it was built between AD 114 and 116 in honour of Julius Antiochus Filopappos, a prominent Roman consul and administrator. The marble-paved path, laid out in the 1950s by modernist architect Dimitris Pikionis, starts near the periptero (kiosk) on Dionysiou Areopagitou. After 250m, it passes the excellent Church of Agios Dimitrios Loumbardiaris, which contains fine frescoes. There's a detour to Socrates' prison, and the main path leads to the Shrine of the Muses, cut into the rock face just below the top of the hill. Inhabited from prehistoric times to the post-Byzantine era, the area was, according to Plutarch, the area where Theseus and the Amazons did battle. In the 4th and 5th centuries BC, defensive fortifications – such as the Themistoclean wall and the Diateichisma – extended over the hill, and some of their remains are still visible.”
  • Recommandé par 135 habitants
Emplacement
25 Mitseon
Athina, 117 42
Téléphone+30 21 0322 4625